Lenten Reflections

The season of Lent will soon be upon us. The first day of Lent, Ash Wednesday, happens to fall on Valentine’s Day this year. That’s poetic, I suppose, since Lent is a time to examine our hearts.

The word “Lent” comes from an old English word for “lengthen,” and refers to the lengthening of those long-anticipated days of spring. The forty-day period before Easter offers Christians pause to reflect on our spirituality, examine our hearts, and take an inventory of our lives. Why forty days? The number forty is derived from the traditional forty days Jesus spent in the wilderness at the beginning of his ministry. His desert sojourn was a time of solitude and self-examination, quiet prayer and meditation.

We are offering several such soul-nourishing opportunities during this season, including Sunday covenant groups (a new five-week session begins Feb. 25th), Wednesday Evening Fellowship meals and classes (starting Feb. 21st) and “Christian Mindfulness,” a seven-week Lenten experience facilitated by Joseph Lambrecht and myself, utilizing spiritual practices of centering prayer, lectio divina and contemplative prayer (begins the week of Feb. 5th, offered at three different times: Mondays from 6:30-7:30pm (Adult Room), Tuesdays from 1:30-2:30pm (Friendship Village) and Thursdays from 10:00-11:00am (Adult Room).

A Lenten devotional based on the poetry of Mary Oliver will be available to help enrich your journey to Easter. I hope to worship with you on Ash Wednesday, Valentine’s Day, at 7pm as we commence the season of Lent.

Blessings, Pastor Jeff


Happy New Year

Philips Brooks, who gave us “O Little Town of Bethlehem” for Christmas, has given us another gift for the New Year. Discovering in his own experience that life was too short to nurse grievances, harbor grudges, remain resentful, he made this confession to his congregation:

 

You who are letting miserable misunderstandings run on from year to year, meaning to clear them up some day;

you who are keeping wretched quarrels alive because you cannot quite make up your mind that now is the day to sacrifice your pride and forgive;

you who are passing someone. . . not speaking . . . out of some spite, and yet knowing that it would fill you with shame and remorse if you heard that the other died this morning;

you who are letting your friend’s heart ache for a word of appreciation or sympathy which you mean to give someday;

if you only could know and see and feel, all of a sudden, that time is short, how it would break the spell! How you would go instantly and do the thing which you might never have another chance to do.

 

Here’s to a New Year and a New Slate. An opportunity to start afresh, mend bridges and heal rifts. “Behold,” says the Spirit of Life, “I am making all things new!”

 

Blessings, Pastor Jeff


Christmas Blessings

A number of years ago, Janice and I had the good fortune to visit Amsterdam. It was April and the tulip fields were in full glory! Another highlight was a tour of the Anne Frank House. As you know, that courageous youth left the legacy of a journal that continues to inspire new generations of readers. She has fast become a hero to our daughters. May her words bring fresh meaning to your Christmas:

Give of yourself, give as much as you can! And you can always, always give something, even if it is only kindness!

If everyone were to do this and not be as mean with a kindly word then there would be much more justice and love in the world. Give and you shall receive, much more that you would ever thought possible. Give, give again and again, don’t lose courage, keep it up and go on giving! No one has ever become poor from giving!

As we find ourselves amidst the hustle and bustle of what the Christmas season has come to mean for so many of us, we would do well to consider gifts of love, gifts that need not be bought or even wrapped. As Anne Frank reminds us, abundant life cannot be found apart from giving of ourselves.

May this prayer by DeWane Zimmerman (my pastor growing up) help guide us in the coming days:

O God, lest I come to Christmas
over-committed and under-nourished,
more pressured and less prepared,
more filled with Christmas shove than love,
trying to buy what can’t be bought,
help me each day to take time:
to look often and long
at the marvelous earth
and all that lives upon it,
to be with heart and soul
a friend with all I find.

Merry Christmas, Pastor Jeff