Wesley and the People Called Methodists

John Wesley, the co-founder of what would become the United Methodist Church, relates in his journal a life-changing experience while crossing the Atlantic in 1736. The voyage to America took four months and the passengers were comprised of two main groups: folks from England and German Moravian Christians. Toward the end of the journey there was a third storm, more violent than the others.

“In the midst of a worship service the sea broke over, split the main‑sail to pieces, covered the ship, poured in between the decks, as if the great deep had already swallowed us up. A terrible screaming was heard from the midst of the English, but the Germans calmly continued to sing their hymn. Afterwards I asked one of them, ‘Were you not afraid?’ He answered, ‘I thank God, no.’ I asked, ‘But were not your women and children afraid?’ He replied mildly, ‘No; our women and children are not afraid to die.’

Deeply moved by the faith of the Moravians, Wesley wrote, “It was the most glorious day I had ever before experienced.”

It would be some time before Wesley himself would experience that utter assurance of God’s unconditional love and acceptance, and be able to declare, with Paul, that

“… neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor rulers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

I believe we are all looking for that Gospel reassurance – that we are God’s beloved and that there is nothing that can separate us from God’s love.

I find in Wesley’s humanity and life-long quest to follow Jesus a compelling and inspirational example. During the month of August, we will be considering the legacy of John Wesley with a sermon series on spirituality, faith and theology of this remarkable leader. I hope you’ll join me!

Blessings,

Pastor Jeff


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